Panel provided by Chris Natale Here Clint lets Ivan, the owner of his apartment building, know that Clint is not going to be the nice guy like Captain America. He confronts Ivan about buying out the apartment buildingand paying the other residents’ rents in order to keep everyone in their homes.
Panel provided by Chris Natale
Here Clint lets Ivan, the owner of his apartment building, know that Clint is not going to be the nice guy like Captain America. He confronts Ivan about buying out the apartment buildingand paying the other residents’ rents in order to keep everyone in their homes.

Avengers assemble!

You may know the character, Hawkeye, as portrayed by actor Jeremy Renner from the movie, “The Avengers” (2012) released by Marvel Studios.

While this character may be better known for his live screen adaptation, I will be reviewing a comic book that was released in that same year, written by Matt Fraction and drawn by David Aja, which shows Hawkeye in a different light.

Some facts that you should know about Hawkeye before reading this: He has no super powers and isn’t rich like Tony Stark. He is an excellent marksman (specializing in bow and arrows) and hand-to-hand combatant, trained by Captain America in his past. He enjoys the color purple, and at the end of the day, whether the Avengers like to admit it or not, they need him.

I have to say, right off the bat, the first issue of Fraction’s run of “Hawkeye” was a breath of fresh air. It characterized Hawkeye in a way that I have never seen done before in any previous Marvel titles. Starting with Clint falling out of a building with the quote, “Okay… this looks bad” my attention was held immediately and it also made me laugh. This story centered more on a day in the life of Clint Barton rather than Hawkeye, the Avenger.

Matt Fraction starts off by giving you a little bit of background on Hawkeye just to hold your attention, and then he gets right into how Clint spends his days. David Aja’s art is also perfect for this book. It’s simple and unique. The panels are beautifully structured, and the mostly purple color scheme allows the art to flow flawlessly.

Hawkeye, along with the other characters, are drawn with simplicity and are not very detailed, but it really works for the story. It just goes to show you that you don’t need complex art to tell an interesting story.

The only part I would say threw me off was the issue going back and forth from what happened in the past to what was happening in the present. Once you go back and look again, it becomes easier to put together.

I also enjoyed that the editing staff of this book wrote a letter to fans in the last pages of this issue and mentioned that this issue was “shaped by the cop shows and pop-funk of the 1970s.” They also suggest that you should listen to “Fire Dance” from Dizzy Gillespie and Lalo Schifrin’s album, “Free Ride.” After reading the issue, I listened to this song and felt that it captured the mood and feel of the story and art perfectly.

Overall, I love how Hawkeye was done in this issue and I have never read a Marvel title like this before. I can’t wait to see where this series takes the Earth’s Mightiest Marksman.

 

Hawkeye #1 (2012)

Rating: Easily 10/10

 

***Want More?***

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