John Flynn//The Crown Mets fans gather for the 4th game of the World Series against the Kansas City Royals.
John Flynn//The Crown
Mets fans gather for the 4th game of the World Series against the Kansas City Royals.

Every baseball player dreams of playing in one event: the World Series. Luckily for me, my favorite team, the New York Mets shocked the baseball world by making it through the playoffs and advancing to the World Series.

I knew before the playoffs began that games would take place at Citi Field over Halloween weekend, if the Mets made it. My parents felt if the Mets were in the World Series that I could go home to New York to see the World Series.

With the scheduling quirks, I only went to Game 4 of the World Series between the Mets and the Kansas City Royals on Halloween night.

Last February, through a high school connection, I applied and received a job to work on the Citi Field promotions staff. In other words: I would help with the giveaways—from bobbleheads to free t-shirts to rally towels in the playoffs.

I picked a perfect time to start a job and attend games for my beloved Mets and the best part was that it was all for free.

Citi Field has always been advertised as one of the best ballparks in baseball and the missing component was a winning Mets team. This year’s World Series tickets are the most expensive in baseball history, with a reported price of an average ticket costing nearly $1700.

My day at Citi Field began with the promotions department, as we gave away rally towels and credit card wallets. I was assigned to the bullpen gate, which was a bit easier to work in than left field, where I was assigned to most of the season. There I said to fans things like “Welcome to Citi Field; enjoy the game!” and “Enjoy October baseball here at Citi Field” as I distributed the items.

I usually sign up for work whenever the Mets have giveaways, always with the special perk of staying after work to watch the game for free.

It was particularly special for me as a Mets fan to actually go to (and work at) the World Series. I got to my seat in the outfield after the fifth inning. I snuck into the area after Michael Conforto’s second home run, and there I found my friends from The 7 Line Army that I met earlier in the year.

John Flynn//The Crown The 7 Line Army was founded in 2012 by Darren Meenan and continues to faithfully assemble in support of the New York Mets.
John Flynn//The Crown
The 7 Line Army was founded in 2012 by Darren Meenan and continues to faithfully assemble in support of the New York Mets.

The 7 Line Army was founded in 2012 by Darren Meenan, who also founded “7 Line,” a company dedicated to Mets merchandise and fan apparel. The company was named for the number 7 train of the subway in New York which stops at Citi Field.

We do our own chants in the 7 Line Army separate from the rest of the stadium. For example, after a strikeout, we put our right arm toward the field and say “Heeeeeeee… Struck! Him! Out!” which was actually started by some people at Shea Stadium in the 1980s and that tradition has continued to the present day.

When Mets players are up at-bat, pre-arranged chants are made for the specific players. For example, whenever Mets catcher Travis d’Arnaud is batting, we sing “D Apostrophe Arnaud” to the tune of the kid song “Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes.” Those chants change to suit the circumstances.

As for the fans, they were waving the orange rally towels I gave at the gates all night, giving the stadium and the Mets extra energy to feed from, especially when the opponent had two strikes against him.

Citi Field was electric that night until the eighth inning. With the Mets up 3-2, Mets second basemen, Daniel Murphy, made an error that allowed the Royals to score three runs in the inning.

The stadium got very quiet pretty quickly and it took away the energy from everyone (except for the few Royals fans in attendance).

Kansas City defeated the Mets 5-3 and they won their first championship in 30 years the next night.

I am good with baseball trivia, especially who won the World Series in a particular year and who they defeated, but I consider myself cheap—my only route to postseason baseball was actually working in Flushing for the Mets.

This game went down as one of the biggest gut-punching losses in Mets team history.

But now, because of my experience at Citi Field during the World Series, I can hand down my stories about the 2015 season to my children and grandchildren.

Every baseball fan’s dream is to go see the World Series, and because nobody knows exactly when their favorite team will return to baseball’s “Promised Land”, I succumbed to an opportunity my parents gave me when we knew there would be baseball at Citi Field on a weekend.

I will remember this experience and magical season forever.